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Welcome to the 2018 MOBIUS Annual Conference!
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Monday, June 4
 

12:00pm

Registration
Monday June 4, 2018 12:00pm - 5:00pm
Pre-function space

1:00pm

MOBIUS Membership Meeting
Annual member meeting

Monday June 4, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Salon A/B

2:30pm

Tour: Midwest Genealogy Center, Mid-Continent Public Library - Shuttle Sponsored by Innovative Interfaces, Inc.
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

The shuttle(s) will leave at 2:30 pm. Please pick up your ticket and information at the conference registration desk before then.

2:30pm

Tour: Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & Museum - Shuttle Sponsored by Innovative Interfaces, Inc.
Limited Capacity filling up

The shuttle(s) will leave at 2:30 pm. Please pick up your ticket and information at the conference registration desk before then.

Monday June 4, 2018 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Truman Library https://www.trumanlibrary.org/

2:30pm

Tour: Country Club Plaza - Shuttle Sponsored by Innovative Interfaces, Inc.
Enjoy an afternoon, self-guided tour around the Kansas City Country Club Plaza. Shop or grab a bite to eat amid the numerous restaurants and shops. The shuttle will leave the Stoney Creek Hotel at 2:30 and will pick up at TBD at 6 pm to return you in plenty of time for the Keynote Presentation and the Networking Reception.

Monday June 4, 2018 2:30pm - 6:30pm
Country Club Plaza https://countryclubplaza.com/

7:00pm

Keynote Presentation: CritLib, Capitalism, and Defending the Library
An examination, celebration, and critique of the practice of critical librarianship. CritLib is a necessary tool in the evolution and survival of libraries, and it can be a unifying experience for individuals within the institution of the Library, even if they disagree on cultural or political issues.

Speakers
avatar for Charlie Bennett

Charlie Bennett

Public Engagement Librarian, Georgia Tech Library
In the course of my programming-librarian career, I have turned into a hybrid radio/podcast librarian. I co-host two radio shows on WREK Atlanta: I am one of several interviewers for The North Avenue Lounge and I am part of the team that produces Lost in the Stacks, the one-and-only... Read More →
avatar for Ameet Doshi

Ameet Doshi

Subject Librarian, School of Public Policy, Georgia Tech
Ameet Doshi was born in Chicago and worked as a librarian in Illinois and North Carolina before joining Georgia Tech where he serves as the subject librarian for the School of Public Policy. His research interests include: assessing the user experience, bibliometrics, trendspotting... Read More →


Monday June 4, 2018 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Salon A/B

8:00pm

20th Anniversary Celebration Reception
Weather permitting, we will celebrate MOBIUS' 20th anniversary outside with food, beverages, music and s'mores!

Monday June 4, 2018 8:00pm - 10:00pm
Outdoor Courtyard
 
Tuesday, June 5
 

7:00am

Registration
Tuesday June 5, 2018 7:00am - 5:00pm
Pre-function space

7:15am

Breakfast
Tuesday June 5, 2018 7:15am - 8:30am
Elements Hall

7:15am

8:00am

General Session
Tuesday June 5, 2018 8:00am - 8:20am
Elements Hall

8:20am

9:30am

Creating a Wow Worthy Library Website
Our library desperately needed to update its website. We previously had web pages created through a campus-wide content management system, but that was proving to be too difficult to update and coordinate between departments. Ultimately, we decided to branch out on our own and create a library specific website that was separate from the institution’s website. At first, this was an overwhelming idea since I had never built a website before and I would not have ongoing help from our IT and marketing departments. That’s when I found Stacks! Stacks is a hosted web platform designed by library professionals specifically for libraries; they are also in partnership with EBSCO.
This session will cover the reasoning behind the library’s need for change, communication on campus with other departments, and their decision-making process. I will tell how I ultimately led the redesign on my own, what kind of time and input from the team in the library it all took, and finally, how it turned out. Mara Egherman and Christopher Holly from EBSCO will co-present and share their insights on the project’s success and the features of the Stacks platform.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Vaughn

Chris Vaughn

William Jewell College


Tuesday June 5, 2018 9:30am - 10:20am
Wood Room

9:30am

Do You Use Acquisitions? Why Not?
In Sierra, everyone may use Circulation and Cataloging but many fewer of us use Acquisitions, and those of us that do use it, have different workflows and expectations from this function. In this panel discussion, four libraries, represented by Holli Henslee (Drury University), Christina Prucha (State Technical College of Missouri), Brady Shuman (Covenant Seminary), and Natasha Young (Northwest Missouri State University), will explain why they use Acquisitions. They will discuss how Acquisitions is set up at in their libraries, their workflows, and the kinds of details they are able to capture and track within Sierra because of this function. The session is geared towards people who do not currently use Acquisitions and are curious about how it works and why a library would choose to use it. It may also be of interest to those currently using Acquisitions as a point of comparison to their own setup, workflow, and use.

Speakers
avatar for Holli Henslee

Holli Henslee

Technical Services Coordinator, Drury University
avatar for Brady Shuman

Brady Shuman

Tech Services Specialist, Covenant Theological Seminary
avatar for Natasha Young

Natasha Young

Acquisitions, Research Librarian, Northwest Missouri State University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 9:30am - 10:20am
Metal Room

9:30am

Lean & Mean: Flash-Weeding to Reduce Risk and Maximize Return on Investment in the Physical Monograph Collection
At Park University's McAfee Memorial Library, we are committed to supporting our patrons in the digital spaces in which they live, learn, and work. With over 80% of our students either online or at remote campus centers, it just makes sense for us to become a truly digital library. However, because not every resource can be provided online, maintaining our physical collections continues to be a high priority for us.
Due to the premium placed on campus space, we pour enormous resources into maintaining our physical collections. We store our books at an off-site Annex and page them upon request. We must pay rent for that off-site storage space, pay part-time staff to help maintain the stacks, and devote significant full-time staff hours to shelving, paging, and travel time between the library and the stacks. How do we balance the resources consumed by our physical collections against our need to spend time and money directly supporting students while building a world-class digital collection?
Our answer: flash-weeding.
Currently, our monographs are packed onto 7-foot shelving that is often filled to 100% capacity. Lack of space to reshelve books has led to a semi-permanent staging area where books that are returned from circulation are kept in call number order, but outside of the main file. Our Annex is a cave with floors that are slowly heaving. Shelving has collapsed in the past, and many remaining units are leaning despite the “earthquake bars” installed to stabilize them. The concrete floors are cracking as the stone underneath rises. Aisles are narrow, often no more than 20 inches wide. Poor lighting and dust are common throughout the space. These challenging working conditions will only worsen as time goes on.
Our flash-weeding project will reduce our physical monograph collection from over 97,000 volumes to an estimated 9,000 volumes, a reduction of 89%. The remaining monographs will be safely tucked into the most stable portion of our Annex, occupying 16% of their current physical space. By flash-weeding, we hope to complete the project by July 31.
This fast-track project eliminates phases when necessary and overlaps them whenever possible. We invite you to come learn about our vision for a lean and mean print collection, our process and progress, lessons learned along the way, and our prognosis for on-time completion.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Bleier

Karen Bleier

Collection Management & Resource Sharing Librarian, Park University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 9:30am - 10:20am
Water Room

9:30am

What will a 22nd Century Library Be?
College and university long-term planning and strategic outlooks vary by type of institution, but a key point in all planning is that library resources are and will continue to be needed for curriculum and research support. The future of higher education and the future of academic libraries are linked closely, just as their history is. Many different consultants and corporations are offering ways to predict the future of higher education, studying trends in teaching, learning and student demographics, as well as other social trends.
Groups such as Ithaka and OCLC do research on library futures. The Association of Research Libraries and the American Library Association's Association of College and Research Libraries also support research on both the present and the future in their Value of Academic Libraries and other projects. Using the information these and other groups generate provides the opportunity for libraries and institutions to look to the future. Public libraries also do long-term planning of course and must focus on their tax support and fit within other civic groups and often city and village governments. Perceptions of users, both students, and community members, are key issues in planning.
Different groups of stakeholders can approach planning in different ways. Academic administrators come with experience at other institutions and can bring sets of assumptions that are not accurate in different places with different funding models. Professional groups within librarianship must work with all their stakeholders for planning to be practical and effective. The American Library Association's ongoing Symposium on the Future of Libraries has offered examples of future-oriented projects and directions being pursued across the U.S. Futurists writing about technology and education offer other examples of predictions and planning models. Educause also offers information, reports, and resources for the discussions.
Librarians at all levels need to share in the conversations about long-term and short-term questions on the future of libraries. Even though some may feel the topic is over-discussed, government leaders and administrators continue to have many misperceptions that only communication and education can address. Being armed with data and the latest information is essential for those advocating for libraries, both now and in the future. Understanding the issues and presenting that data and information effectively is crucial for libraries' success and services to users in that long-term future.
Attendees will hear the highlights of the latest data on perceptions, planning, and predictions for libraries in higher education and beyond, along with a getting a chance to make their own predictions.

Speakers
AR

Ann Riley

Vice Provost and University Librarian, University of Missouri


Tuesday June 5, 2018 9:30am - 10:20am
Earth Room

9:30am

With a Little Help from Our Friends-Making Change Happen with University Partners
Limited Capacity seats available

Information Technology and library working relationships historically have a storied past. However at Saint Louis University, the two independent units partnered to create an Academic Technology Commons (ATC) replete with numerous learning/teaching technologies and spaces and a one-stop “genius-bar” inspired service area that supports media, an IT helpdesk, and library functions. The ATC project origins were a symptom of common challenges found in higher education – space and new collaborations. IT was seeking a new space for their instructional media center. The library was seeking new ways to respond to the changing information landscape within the academic enterprise. With seed money from the University President what began as a “what if” informal conversation evolved into a 2.5 year thoughtful and productive exploration into a new collaboration space. Financial barriers were encountered to bring the plan to life, so other campus partners were considered and brought into the process. Reaching-out to student government ultimately yielded the impetus to move the project from a plan to a reality. After seven months of construction the new space in the library opened. Independent units working towards a common goal and in a common space are a new reality in the academic environment. This panel presentation will outline the process of creating the space, highlighting the benefits and challenges of collaboration during the planning and construction, and finally explaining next steps on moving forward. The partnership is not a one and done endeavor. Once the Academic Technology Commons opened a new set of expectations, although planned for, became immediately apparent with the two independent units working in a common space. Full-time staffing issues, student supervision dynamics, and faculty engagement will be discussed. The flexibility, cooperation, unique insights and perspective of all the members of the partnership are a model that partnership can yield meaningful results.

Speakers
avatar for Martha Allen

Martha Allen

Saint Louis University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 9:30am - 10:20am
Fire Room

10:30am

Comparing Cataloging Utilities-OCLC and SkyRiver
Mobius libraries have four choices to find bibliographic records for their new or old additions to their collections. Your choices are:
1.OCLC
2.SkyRiver
3.Using local/remote records within Mobius
4.Combo of #3 and original cataloging
And since most don’t want to do original cataloging unless they have to, we are left with three viable options. I will place my emphasis on options one and two, OCLC and SkyRiver. Both are good options, but is one better than the other, or…
Some of the things that will be considered are:
1.Availability of DLC records
2.Costs
3.Ease of use
4.Help availability
5.Size of database
6.Searching pre-1900 titles
7.Searching foreign languages
8.Subject matter problems
9.What to consider when selecting a vendor
Some of the things a library must consider are:
1.How many titles are being added annually
2.Are the titles added unique subject matter
3.Size of the cataloging staff, i.e. one dedicated cataloger, part-time cataloger, copy cataloger, etc.
4.How comfortable cataloging is the cataloger
5.How fast do you need new titles in the system and on the shelves, i.e. can you wait until another library adds it to the consortium
No recommendations will be given but I want you present you with some ideas to assist in your decision making.

Speakers
CP

Cheryl Postlewait

Cataloging and Acquisitions Librarian, Part-time, Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and William Jewell College


Tuesday June 5, 2018 10:30am - 11:20am
Water Room

10:30am

Contemporary Collection: Bridges between Patrons and Libraries
Collection development is largely defined as the process of choosing which materials are added to libraries. It would be beneficial to broaden the concept of collection development to reflect the continuity and interconnectivity characteristic of the contemporary information environment. At Missouri Southern State University, our mission is to serve diverse library users and to expand our resources. The Contemporary Collection practice began in 2013 with the Colbert Report and the Daily Show collections. Such Just-In-Time collections allowed us to be flexible in supplying content and to diversify the library resources. Since then, the Contemporary Collection has become a “standing” component in our library, and several unique and viable collections have been created and acquired to meet the specific needs of the campus and the community as they arise.
This presentation will focus on the joint efforts made by two departments for the creation and maintenance of the Contemporary Collection. We will introduce how a new collection is initiated at the Access Services Department, how the associated items are chosen and placed on display, and what promotions are conducted on campus and through multi-media. We will discuss the practice of the Technical Services Department in cataloging and processing the materials for the Contemporary Collection as well as running its continuous maintenance. The lifespan of two eventually dismantled collections will be explored. In addition, we will share the benefits of our growing collections and patronage as well as the lessons gained from our experience.

Speakers
HL

Hong Li

Technical Services Librarian, Missouri Southern State University
KR

Kayla Reed

Access Services Librarian, Missouri Southern State University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 10:30am - 11:20am
Fire Room

10:30am

From Dusty Corners to Digital Collections: Building and Using an Online Archive
Central Methodist University is a small, private university in rural Missouri, with a rich and curious history. This is reflected in the Library's Archives and Special Collections, but unfortunately, due to the fragility and uniqueness of the materials, they could not be shared with the Library's wider community of students, faculty, staff, administration, and alumni.
Happily, this was changed with the arrival of a grant for the Consortium on Digital Resources for Teaching and Learning, which allowed us to scan, add, and share our collection in SharedShelf Commons (http://www.sscommons.org/openlibrary), where our items could be shared via a single platform and Creative Commons License with like-minded institutions. Later, the addition of Omeka.net to our digital archives program allowed us to construct digital exhibits at http://cmuspecialcollections.omeka.net, that could complement our physical exhibits of Archives and Special Collections items.
In our talk, we'll highlight the process of building a digital archive, including topics like engaging students, alumni and faculty, wrangling with technology, and plans for the future.

Speakers
avatar for John Coleman

John Coleman

Evening Library Supervisor/Work Study Coordinator, Central Methodist University- Smiley Memorial Library
avatar for Jennifer Parsons

Jennifer Parsons

Digital Resources Librarian, Central Methodist University
Archives, archival digitization, interlibrary loan, and open access are all professional interests of mine.


Tuesday June 5, 2018 10:30am - 11:20am
Metal Room

10:30am

Going Greek: Implementing OpenAthens to Authenticate Online Library Users
OpenAthens is not only a gateway between the online world of library resources and those who want to access it, but it is the dashboard that can make librarians’ lives less complex. Learn how libraries of all types and sizes can utilize OpenAthens’ flexible management options to enhance the online experience by providing single sign-on (SSO) for both on-site and remote users of all types. We will also take a peek at the security and networking advantages of using OpenAthens versus a traditional proxy server. Perhaps most importantly, OpenAthens’ reporting features can help support data-driven collection decisions and quantify the link between library usage and student success and retention.

Speakers
avatar for Jon Ritterbush

Jon Ritterbush

Director of Library Services and Learning Commons, Park University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 10:30am - 11:20am
Earth Room

10:30am

The Future in Context: Innovative’s Next Generation
 A discussion of Innovative’s development of a next-generation BIBFRAME native context engine and discovery platform and what it means for libraries.

Speakers
TJ

Tom Jacobson

VP, Executive Library Advocate & Strategist, Innovative Interfaces


Tuesday June 5, 2018 10:30am - 11:20am
Wood Room

11:30am

Group Photo by Drone
Do you like eating lunch? Great! Then, join us for a large group photo right before lunch! We will gather outside (weather permitting) for a photo with a drone photographer.

Tuesday June 5, 2018 11:30am - 11:45am
Outdoor Courtyard

11:45am

Lunch
Tuesday June 5, 2018 11:45am - 1:00pm
Elements Hall

1:00pm

A Visual Approach to Library Data
Do others really know the Library’s activities or its value to your institution or community? A lot of good data already exists in your library that can be used to create attractive graphics that will inform others, and promote your library. We will discuss how to gather, combine and organize library data. We will also demonstrate various tools you can use (including free tools) to visualize the data. Lastly, we will show options of how to organize the visualizations into a report format, or to create a flyer or poster that can be used to show the library’s impact and value.

Speakers
avatar for Lee Cummings

Lee Cummings

STEM Research & Instruction Librarian, Saint Louis University
avatar for Judy Geczi

Judy Geczi

Business Librarian, Saint Louis University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Metal Room

1:00pm

Addressing the 20th Century Gap: Controlled Digital Lending for In-Copyright Material
Book scanning projects have made tremendous strides in bringing public domain literature online for the world's scholars and enthusiasts, but materials published after 1923 are still not widely available due to copyright restrictions. The Internet Archive has developed a controlled digital lending framework that enables libraries to digitize and lend an ebook of a non-circulating physical volume stored on their shelves. Through controlled digital lending, libraries can make available the 20th-century scholarship that is largely absent from their digital holdings in a way that respects the rights of authors and publishers. Controlled digital lending works at consortia-scale as well, enabling groups of libraries to pool their print collections and lend ebooks against non-circulating copies.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Freeland

Chris Freeland

Director of Open Libraries, Internet Archive
Chris Freeland is the Director of Open Libraries at the Internet Archive, working with partners in the library world to select, source, digitize and lend a the most useful books for scholars, students, library patrons and people with disabilities around the world. Before joining the... Read More →


Tuesday June 5, 2018 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Earth Room

1:00pm

Brilliant Innovations and Everyday Frustrations: How Idea Lab Can Help
In 2017, Innovative and the Innovative Users Group (IUG) partnered together to launch Idea Lab, an innovation platform hosted by Spigit. Idea Lab is an interactive space that allows any staff member of any Innovative library customer to submit ideas for how current products should work or for new products that should be developed. Idea Lab replaced the legacy Enhancements system that IUG managed for many years. It fits the needs of Innovative's current product development cycle and provides meaningful feedback and crowd validation processes so Innovative can prioritize enhancements and development based upon actual customer needs and desires. This presentation will explain the history of the IUG enhancements process, explain the need for Idea Lab, and demonstrate how it works. Attendees will learn key terms used in Idea Lab, how to submit ideas with the best chance of advancing to implementation, and other ways to be more involved in the development conversation with Innovative.

Speakers
avatar for Renee Brumett

Renee Brumett

Electronic Resources Librarian, Springfield-Greene County Library


Tuesday June 5, 2018 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Water Room

1:00pm

Creating a Strategic Plan & keeping on Track by Using Office 365
Limited Capacity seats available

With a new building and more collaboration taking place on Lindenwood University’s campus, the Library Services and Writing Center departments decided to band together to create a strategic plan that would benefit both departments. This presentation will highlight how we worked together to create the strategic plan. Then, after we had the plan outline of what we wanted to do, we looked for ways to keep track of our progress and decided to use Planner within Office 365 to keep everyone on the same page and to make everyone accountable for their tasks. We will show how Planner works and keeps us on track.

Speakers
SE

Susan Edele

Director of the Writing Center, Lindenwood University
LM

Liz MacDonald

Dean, Lindenwood University
avatar for Nancy Messina

Nancy Messina

Director, Reference Services, Lindenwood University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Wood Room

1:00pm

Linking Academic Libraries to LSTA Grants & Grant Writing Tips
This session will cover LSTA grant writing basics and tips, as well as an overview of the Missouri State Library’s LSTA funded grants that academic libraries are eligible to apply for. These include the Show Me Steps to Continuing Education grant, the Digital Imaging grant, the Library Service Improvement Grant, and the Spotlight on Literacy grant. At the end of the session, the MOSL panel will take questions from the audience about grants and grant projects.

Speakers
RA

Regina Anderson

Grants Officer, Missouri State Library
MB

Matt Butler

Digitization Consultant, Missouri State Library
avatar for Lisa Stock

Lisa Stock

Adult Services Consultant, Missouri State Library
BW

Becky Wilson

Public Library Services Consultant, Missouri State Library


Tuesday June 5, 2018 1:00pm - 1:50pm
Fire Room

2:00pm

Delivering Customer Service Excellence: It's not Optional
Kate Zabriskie said, "The customer's perception is your reality." This quote is simple yet powerful. If customers, or library users in our case, have a certain perception or opinion, we cannot simply shrug this off as ignorance or indifference. We must be both reactive and proactive to avoid these impressions. In a period of time where no portion of the library budget seems to be sacred, we must deliver excellent customer service to our library users. We must be diligent and proactive about knowing what our library users need and want. Related to this, Steve Jobs said, "Get closer than ever to your customers. So close that you tell them what they need well before they realize it themselves."
In most cases, successful customer service strategies transcend one industry to another. We as librarians can learn from the entire customer service spectrum. This presentation will attempt to discuss notable customer service qualities, customer service deficiencies, and discuss how these can help improve service at our individual libraries.

Speakers
JJ

Jon Jones

Director of Library Services, Baptist Bible College & Theological Seminary


Tuesday June 5, 2018 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Earth Room

2:00pm

Digital Media Commons Lite: establishing a student digital media commons & lab on a slim budget
Developing new service models for student learning in spaces not dedicated for the purpose is a perennial challenge for academic libraries. Continued funding declines complicate the problem. Low staffing, heavy workloads, and a general lack of time may seem to prevent the development of new and innovative services. Indeed, the allure of a fully-fledged and highly resourced digital media commons probably seems out of reach for libraries that are considering which major services, or databases to cut. We suggest focusing on progress and scaffolding success to help you get closer to creating that commons or lab and to providing the kinds of learning spaces you'd like your students to have. Even in times when budgets are tight, it is still possible to gather resources, interest, and support from colleagues and realign them with an overarching strategic goal.
The result for MU Libraries is ongoing as we constantly re-imagine existing spaces and build on incremental progress to create useful and relevant services for students and staff. In this presentation, we will highlight the importance of iterative goal setting as we talk about our journey from a recording space for library instruction material to what we have now: a digital media commons and a lab that serves as a production space for librarian projects and a learning and project space for students.

Speakers
AB

Alora Bauer

E-Learning Graduate Assistant, University of Missouri
NK

Navadeep Khanal

E-Learning and Web Development Librarian, University of Missouri


Tuesday June 5, 2018 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Metal Room

2:00pm

Grant Writing with the Missouri Digital Newspaper Project
Abigail Broadbent is the Archives and Technical Services Librarian for William Jewell College's Library Services. In her first year as an Archivist, she decided to apply for a LSTA Digitization Grant for the historic "Word & Way," a publication for Missouri Baptists. Her Library Director suggested she reach out to the Missouri Digital Newspaper Project, and Patsy Luebbert, the Grant Manager, provided step-by-step assistance in preparing the Grant for submission. She will describe exactly how Patsy Luebbert helped her craft a successful application, and Patsy will explain what the criteria are for those who wish to partner with the MDNP, and the steps that are taken on behalf of the Library or Archive after a successful proposal. This presentation will be of particular interest to those institutions with collections of historic publications and archivists who wish to learn more about the grant process.

Speakers
avatar for Abigail Broadbent

Abigail Broadbent

Archives and Technical Services Librarian, William Jewell College


Tuesday June 5, 2018 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Wood Room

2:00pm

Kicking Into Overdrive! Creating a Shared Collection of Audio and ebooks for Academic Libraries
In an increasingly connected world, academic libraries are stepping up to meet the needs of students who are in constant connection with the digital world and turn to the internet for nearly everything. In efforts to remain relevant and engage with this generation of patrons, we need to develop new resources and services to meet them where they are. Working together can help us get there.
In fall 2017, a charter group of eight academic libraries began working with MOBIUS and OverDrive to create a shared collection of thousands of audio and ebooks. The experience has been overwhelmingly positive, both for us and our patrons. Alongside the advantages of shared pricing and maintenance, the consortial arrangement allows us to benefit from one another’s knowledge and experience. In this panel session, librarians from participating libraries and MOBIUS will chronicle the process from the outset and discuss collection development decisions, MARC records management, and questions about access, as well as the challenges and successes we’ve met along the way. We’ll also highlight some of the reasons for creating the collection, how the collection is managed, and the circulation numbers we’ve seen thus far.

Speakers
PH

Paul Huffman

University Archivist - Reference Librarian, Lindenwood University
avatar for Julie Portman

Julie Portman

Technical Services + Metadata Librarian, Fontbonne University
KR

Kayla Reed

Access Services Librarian, Missouri Southern State University
avatar for Christina Virden

Christina Virden

E-Resources Coordinator, MOBIUS


Tuesday June 5, 2018 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Water Room

2:00pm

Starting with WHY: Communicating Relevance in Information Literacy Instruction
Students are rational actors who make decisions about how to engage with information and with us. By explicitly highlighting the relevance of what we’re teaching, prior to teaching it, we can directly address students’ information literacy assumptions and misconceptions and make instruction truly impactful. If we fail to communicate the relevance of what we’re teaching, we risk undermining our instructional mission. In this presentation, we will tackle some common student assumptions about the information landscape and share how we have addressed them in order to meet students where they are.

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Emery

Jamie Emery

Research & Instruction Librarian, Saint Louis University
avatar for Sarah E. Fancher

Sarah E. Fancher

Library Director, Ozarks Technical Community College


Tuesday June 5, 2018 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Fire Room

2:50pm

3:10pm

Collaborative Funding of Open Access
The practice of libraries working together for mutual benefit is ubiquitous and takes many different forms: interlibrary loan, resource sharing, collaborative collection development and now – open access. The ability to leverage funds through collaborative funding, to offer library users access to resources beyond the local and beyond the paywalls of just the libraries that participate, are powerful forces impelling libraries around the world to work together. Licensing Program Strategist, Sharla Lair, from LYRASIS will provide examples of collaboratively funded open access initiatives, highlighting their successes and challenges, and provide information about how you can support them.

Speakers
avatar for Sharla Lair

Sharla Lair

Licensing Program Strategist, LYRASIS


Tuesday June 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:00pm
Wood Room

3:10pm

How to be LGBT+ friendly from an LGBT+ Librarian
In this presentation, I plan to present my personal journey for information and help in the discovery of my Asexual identity. From questioning to searching for information that was scarce and often biased or inaccurate, my quest for information will be examined and how the library aided in my discoveries. My experiences reflect what many LGBT+ persons go through in their lives and why it is vital that libraries provide accurate, up to date information and services. There are many avenues librarians can take to pursue this information, including joining or being in contact with any campus services or associations that are dedicated to LGBT+ issues. LibGuides, web pages, social media pages, and other resources will be explored and evaluated for their value. Library materials and collections will be discussed and the benefits and negatives of having a collection specifically labeled for the LGBT+ community. Finally, I will discuss digging deeper into the LGBT+ community and the lesser known identities and vocabulary issues that librarians should try to be aware of when selecting resources.

Speakers
KR

Kayla Reed

Access Services Librarian, Missouri Southern State University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:00pm
Water Room

3:10pm

In the Weeds: Using Sierra & Circa for Collection Analysis for Deselection
In an effort to make the right decisions for a collection that needed attention, librarians at Greenlease Library have begun to work through deselecting the stacks based on the call number ranges assigned to academic departments. Liaisons begin with a thorough analysis of the items relevant to their departments before scheduling meetings to talk about options for how to proceed. Using Create Lists is a major aspect of that analysis, as is effective exporting of the data to minimize clean up. Depending on the option faculty choose, specific criteria may be developed and additional lists run. Faculty input is solicited at each step before librarians make final decisions.

Speakers
MC

Melanie Church

Content Services Librarian, Rockhurst University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:00pm
Fire Room

3:10pm

RDA and the LRM: What's changing in cataloging
The IFLA Library Reference Model (LRM) has been adopted by the RSC (RDA Steering Committee) as the underlying theoretical framework for RDA. The LRM is an international standard that has been optimized to both reflect what tasks cataloger users are performing when searching for resources and what catalogers are currently doing to support those tasks. The theoretical model which has emerged is being adopted by the RSC to harmonize RDA, the cataloger's "Bible" used to make bibliographical records inter-compatible and shareable, with models and frameworks used by the international cataloging community. In this way, it is hoped that RDA will become a resource not only for English-speaking catalogers working in the library community, but a truly international standard for use in all communities dealing with cultural artifact records, including libraries, museums, archives, and repositories.
With the change to the LRM, many rules and processes that catalogers have typically relied upon will be modified or deprecated to harmonize with the new framework. This session will go over some of the new changes and additions to RDA and will discuss the ramifications of adopting a model that can be used in a linked data environment. We will also discuss the new, expanded RDA toolkit and its updated format.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Sprochi

Amanda Sprochi

Health Sciences Cataloger, University of Missouri--Columbia
Cataloger of all things digital and print and data janitor at the Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri in Columbia. I have been the Medical Library Association's representative (6 years) to the American Library Association's Committee on Catalogoing: Description and... Read More →


Tuesday June 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:00pm
Metal Room

3:10pm

Show Me Digital Collaboration
Limited Capacity seats available

As library digitization becomes more widespread, best practices have been developed on various topics such as file size and resolution, file format, and minimum metadata standards. However, many questions remain difficult to answer, especially if your software seems limiting, your backup and storage system is subpar, or you want your resources to appear in aggregated search interfaces. What can libraries do if they want to pool their digital resources and share them more widely, but they are using different software or metadata standards? Hear how MissouriHub approached that issue. What if they want to migrate to a new software platform but aren't sure how to evaluate their options? Learn about DAIR – MOBIUS' Digitization and Institutional Repository Task Force. Also learn about Missouri Digital Heritage and some options for getting specific digitization projects off the ground.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Jaycox

Emily Jaycox

Librarian, Missouri Historical Society
avatar for Catherine Lucy

Catherine Lucy

Archivist, Fontbonne University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:00pm
Earth Room

4:10pm

Creating Greater Ties between Faculty and the Library: Ozark Christian College
Ozark Christian College is relatively new to MOBIUS (part of the SWAN cluster), but has benefitted greatly. Due to budgetary restrictions, we lost a trained librarian at the end of the 2016-2017 school year, and a faculty member (presenter) was recruited to dedicate part of his work to take over acquisitions. To say that "it has been a journey" would be an understatement! He attended the MOBIUS conference in June of 2017, and immediately realized he does not speak "Librarianese." In an attempt to do his job well, he has sought a greater "buy in" by his own kind (faculty), and bridge the gap efficiently with "others" (library personnel). Though there is much to learn, the ties are improving. The Faculty Library Committee has been more active this year than at any year in recent history. Something is being done correctly, as Ozark Christian College, a classic Bible college in Joplin with an FTE of under 500, in the SWAN cluster, is second only to Missouri State University in total book checkouts, and in the academic libraries in MOBIUS, is number one in total book checkouts per capita.
The presentation will share what we have done to promote library use among our students, and how we have attempted to allow faculty members to have greater input into decisions made about acquisitions and policies in the library.

Speakers
avatar for David Fish

David Fish

Acquisitions Coordinator, Ozark Christian College


Tuesday June 5, 2018 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Wood Room

4:10pm

Creating Interdisciplinary Space at Missouri State University
Machine learning, artificial intelligence, cyber-physical systems and robotics, human language technologies, human/AI collaboration, machine perception and sensing, augmented and virtual reality, autonomous vehicles, digital personal assistants, robotic/AI librarians, IoT - What a list; and that is only part of the change that has developed and is expected to expand over the next 20 years.
Many questions about the socio-economic impact of these changes spring up. How do people stay informed about these developments? What is the path for access to new technologies? Who will benefit? What impact will there be on employment? How do communities come to agreements on the ethical and legal use of new technologies?
In an effort to bring science and the humanities together in a neutral space, Missouri State University - Duane G Meyer Libray is developing an interdisciplinary space for student and faculty research which will include emerging technologies and data visualization: Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Robotics, Data Visualization, 3D printing, and other technologies in service of interdisciplinary research, active learning, workplace readiness, curricular enhancements, entrepreneurship, and regional economic innovation.
This session will be an informal presentation on our initial idea, support from campus and community, challenges and next steps.

Speakers
JJ

Janelle Johnson

Distributed User Support, Missouri State University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Water Room

4:10pm

Embracing Respacing
The Marketing and Outreach Librarian, Amber Carr, and the Access Services Librarian, Kayla Reed, from Missouri Southern State University walk through the process of re-organizing several collections with no additional cost. Using pictures and layout diagrams, Carr and Reed show the three-year progression of moving over seven different collections to different floors and around the third floor of the library. This presentation will show where the library started, how it moved and removed collections, how it moved again, and how this has changed the library. Checkout statistics show great success in some moves and little to no change in others. However, other moves free up valuable study space for students, even if there is no benefit to the collection itself. Failures, lessons learned, and success stories will all be shared and discussed.

Speakers
AC

Amber Carr

Marketing and Outreach Librarian, Missouri Southern State University
KR

Kayla Reed

Access Services Librarian, Missouri Southern State University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Metal Room

4:10pm

So You Want to Be Embedded?
Limited Capacity seats available

Discover the methods, challenges, training resources, and advocacy involved in sustaining an embedded librarian program. We will also discuss the importance of networking, outreach, and engagement to develop opportunities and awareness of your library’s impact. Other topics covered will include the general challenges faced while embedded, modified embedded programming, and using technology to introduce information searching techniques outside of the library. Finally we will review some recent assessment and evaluation efforts we have completed for the program to demonstrate impact.

Speakers
NF

Nora Franco

Clinical Medical Librarian, University of Missouri Kansas City
KS

Kristy Steigerwalt

Clinical Medical Librarian, UMKC


Tuesday June 5, 2018 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Fire Room

4:10pm

Title 44... What? New Developments in the Federal Depository Program
We all utilize government information in our jobs, whether we’re helping patrons at the reference desk, teaching students in the classroom, or working to support the day-to-day functions of our libraries. But if government information isn’t among your primary responsibilities, it can be hard to keep up with changes that impact the availability of and access to government information. This session will give an overview of the many improvements and changes afoot both officially through potential legislation in Congress and policy changes at the Government Publishing Office, and unofficially through community efforts to preserve and collect government information.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Hyde

Rebecca Hyde

Research & Instruction Librarian, Saint Louis University


Tuesday June 5, 2018 4:10pm - 5:00pm
Earth Room
 
Wednesday, June 6
 

9:00am

If Your Library Is Doing Stuff With OER or Wants To Start, You Should Attend This!
Wondering about OER? Want to know what is out there beyond open textbooks? Interested in learning more about what your library can do? Join us for a half day session to learn more about open educational resources, how to find them, and more. We will also provide an update on the OER landscape in Missouri and the Open Textbook Network initiative.

Speakers
avatar for Grace Atkins

Grace Atkins

Outreach & Open Education Librarian, University of Missouri Libraries
avatar for Christina Virden

Christina Virden

E-Resources Coordinator, MOBIUS


Wednesday June 6, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Fire Room

9:00am

Not “Just A Library Project:” Why & How Libraries are Transforming their IR Services to Campus
An institutional repository is no longer “just a library project”: the IR is now a core part of campus infrastructure, and serves the university’s highest goals. How can your library secure the resources you need to launch a successful IR--and use that investment to expand the library’s role on campus?
 
In this session, we will describe how libraries of different sizes and resources have made the case for funding from campus groups including upper administration, the research office, and the graduate school, by demonstrating how the IR supports institutional priorities.

Next, Roger Weaver, Scholarly Communications Librarian at Missouri University of Science & Technology, will share how his library has implemented innovative IR services through Scholars’ Mine, Missouri S&T’s institutional repository--and how he and his library have used those services to provide support for many of the university’s strategic initiatives, including student recruitment and retention, community engagement, and research and data support.

Finally, we will open the floor to all attendees for a workshop on how to staff and fund an institutional repository, as well as how to develop a successful first-year plan. We will discuss how other libraries have used IR initiatives to carve out a stronger role on campus, and brainstorm ways that your library can replicate their success.

Participants will come away with a toolkit to help identify potential supporters, a roadmap of next steps, and talking points to initiate and propel conversations forward once they get back to campus.

Speakers
PV

Pam Vitu

Solutions Sales Manager, bepress
avatar for Roger Weaver

Roger Weaver

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Missouri University of Science and Technology


Wednesday June 6, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Water Room

9:00am

Sierra Headings Reports (and Authority Control)
How do we know when there are errors in the catalog? Sierra’s Headings Reports tell us – among other things – when there are duplicate records in the system, when an author heading may be out of date, or when subject headings are no longer being used in the catalog. But how are Headings Reports generated, what are they really telling us, how do we fix the problems, and most importantly, how do we know when we can take no action? The MOBIUS Office presents this informative look at Sierra’s Headings Reports. Topics will include indexing and headings normalization, an overview of authority processing, and a hands-on look at the Sierra Reports, including how they are generated and what to do with them. Bring your questions!

Speakers
CG

Christopher Gould

Systems Librarian, MOBIUS


Wednesday June 6, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Wood Room

9:00am

MDI: Transforming Conflict into Positive Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

Does conflict sometimes challenge the day-to-day operations of your organization? Actually, conflict is a natural and even beneficial fact of life in the business environment. However, when not managed well it can result in low morale, decreased productivity, high stress levels, and the loss of good employees, all of which detract from the organization’s performance.
The inability to deal with conflict can undermine a supervisor’s or manager’s effectiveness. Learn how to manage conflict situations to produce positive outcomes.
The Nature of Interpersonal Communication
• Learn how you can tell when someone is displaying confidence, awareness, defensiveness, or insecurity through body language
• Dealing with interpersonal conflict constructively while seeking solutions to problems
• Communicate more effectively by listening for understanding
Factors influencing conflict at work (structural and personal)
• Learn the nature of emotional reactions and the mindset for managing emotions
• Understand the levels of conflict and how to prevent escalation
• Complete the “Conflict Style Inventory” to identify your style
Communication skills for successfully addressing conflict
• Learn the role of listening in conflict resolution and how to do it
• Develop a more accurate vocabulary of words that express feelings
• Understand how to listen and reflect to gain understanding
Approaches to dealing with conflict and when they apply
• Learn why no conflict is as unhealthy as too much
• Discover the eight-step procedure for confronting conflict
• Learn how to identify your own real needs
Benefits of Attending:
Participants will be able to identify the source of a conflict and know the most appropriate corrective action for that source. They will understand the different approaches for dealing with difficult people and which is the most effective approach for a given situation. They will also learn communication skills that will enable them to confront conflict constructively, and they will recognize and be able to address factors in their organization that may be contributing to unproductive conflict.

****A boxed lunch will be served****

Wednesday June 6, 2018 9:00am - 4:00pm
Earth Room

10:30am

Mid-Morning Training Day Break
Wednesday June 6, 2018 10:30am - 10:45am
Pre-function space